Pamela Bailey
RE/MAX On the Move | Insight | Advantage | 603-770-0369 | [email protected]


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 9/11/2019

Planning a move is not a decision made quickly - even if you are moving just some streets away from your present location. It requires a detailed arrangement followed to the letter. Poor planning gives rise to poor calculation and poor execution. As soon as you are sure of a relocation, the earlier you began to make plans – the more comfortable the whole process would be for you. 

Planning a move is like trying to solve a puzzle – every piece must be at the right place to ensure you achieve your big picture. If you miss a step in your relocation process or you forget to schedule a stage at the right time, you might end up messing things up and having a disorganized relocation. To help you plan your relocation move, consider the steps below.

Determine Your Moving Timeline

Before you start making your moving preparation, the first thing to do is to ascertain how much time you have before the move. Doing this would help you make your plans and execute them within the time frame. Even if you have a busy schedule, taking an hour or two out of each day to plan and organize would go a long way. 

Prepare Your Moving Materials

Moving materials like boxes, tapes, old newspaper, etc. are some of the items you can get for free from your grocery store. Other things you might need for relocation – you can get from friends and family members. 

Determine Your Budget for The Move

To ensure you don't spend beyond what you can afford, draw out a budget plan. Relocation most times require much money, especially if you are relocating to a long distance. If you are getting assistance from work, ensure you document every amount spent. Determining your budget would give you an idea of how much you can spend on various moving activities. 

Ditch Your Junk

Moving with all your belongings would cost you a fortune, and it's not a wise decision. You do not possibly use all the things you possess and even if you did, not as often as others. Planning a move is the best time for you to be brutal with your luggage selection. Pack only items of necessity and family heirlooms you cannot afford to part with – other things you can give to charity or sell. 

Determine What to Sell

Items that don't make it into your relocating list; you can sell or give to charity. You can decide on what to sell by determining what is essential to you in your new location. Whatever doesn't fit into these criteria – put up for sale. The money generated from selling some of your belongings might come in handy. 

Compare Moving Fee Quotes

If you would need the service of a moving company, ensure you get quotes from more than one moving company – this helps you compare prices.Planning your relocation makes it easier to move without hassles. Ensure you hire a quality moving company to help you get to your new home safely.




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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 8/28/2019

Getting a dog is a fun and exciting new addition to your life. Deciding you want a dog is pretty easy. They're cute and cuddly, loving and fun, what more is there to know? When it comes to choosing the dog you're going to take it home; it's not always so easy. Taking the time to select the right dog for you is the best decision you can make for you and him. It's essential to review lifestyle, needs, and home to ensure you select the right pet. Here are some basic but probing questions to ask yourself before you head over to the local animal shelter.

Have you cared for a dog before?

If you’re new to dog ownership you might not be considering, all the factors that go into your dog's care. Take a few moments to do a little research and reading about pet ownership and care to get a clear understanding of the commitment you'll be making. A dog will require your time and attention and will affect scheduling and traveling in your life. If you previously owned a dog think back to that time and what was needed from you to care for it. You might even already have a dog, or two. Consider if you have enough to give an additional animal the care they need. 

How much free time do you have to devote to your pet? 

Examine your lifestyle and determine how much time you can devote to your dog. If you can't find enough time in your schedule to walk your dog or play with your new pet multiple hours a day, you should avoid adopting a high energy breed. On the other hand, you might love taking walks and already lead an active outdoor life so adding an active dog to your lifestyle fits nicely. If your schedule doesn't permit enough time to do a lot of training with your pet, you might not be ready at this time to adopt a difficult rescue dog or potty train a brand-new pup. Consider adopting a young (3-6mo old) female dog in a small to medium-sized breed. You might find a long-haired Border Collie or Palmerian beautiful, but do you have enough time to manage all that hair? Your pet should be a positive, comforting and fun addition to your life and each dog requires a different commitment to the next. Whether it’s time spent playing and wearing the dog out, brushing hair or rehabilitating a traumatized animal find a dog that is the right commitment for you. 

Does your home have a yard?

How much space in your home do you have for a dog? You might have a huge yard that is just perfect for a large active dog. The same dog might not be so happy in your downtown studio apartment. Especially if your available time for walks and play is limited (see above). Read about the different breeds of dogs you’re considering or have noted as cute and learn what space requirements they have, outdoor and indoor. If your dog is going to be an indoor pet consider how much space you have inside for them, a small dog can run around and play indoors much better than a large breed. Finally, make a note of any changes you need to make to make your home pet-friendly — furniture arrangements, breakables, expensive rugs, etc. 

Do you have children? 

What are their dispositions and ability to pitch in and help?If you have children, you’ll need to consider their contribution to and experience of the dog's life as well. What are their ages, interest level and ability to help care for the animal? Find a pup that your kids can play with and help train and teach them how to take care of a pet of their own properly. 

What amount from your budget can you invest in your dog?

Finally, consider what amount of money you can afford to put into the dog's care. Larger breeds eat more food and will affect your monthly budget. If you need to groom and board your dog frequently for work travel or take them to doggie care daily run the numbers on possible costs to make sure, you’ll be able to sustain your commitment to your animal. 

If owning a dog indeed is important to you make it a priority during your next home search so you can find the right space for you and your future best friend.




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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 1/23/2019

If you've ever traveled through the United Kingdom, the phrase "mind the gap" conjured up trips across London's Underground or disembodied voices calling out the warning as your elevator doors open or close. It's wise to heed those voices since gaps between an elevator, and the floor of an older building could be wider than you expect, and trains don't touch the sides of the platforms, so you could step off into thin air if you lead with your heel.

Other gaps need mending as well. When it comes to your home, gaps can cause the most lost to energy efficiency.

Common gaps

  • Door gaps. If your exterior doors do not line up in the frame, you’ll have gaps around the door and jamb that allow cold air to leak in during the winter, raising your heating bills, and warm air to radiate in during the summer, jacking up your air conditioning bills. Adjust your door so that it fits snugly in the frame. Most modern thresholds and door shoes (the rubber or vinyl cushion on the bottom of the exterior door) can adjust to fill the gaps. If space remains, use weather stripping to fill it in. If the gap is in the jamb or frame, caulk should do the trick.
  • Window spaces. Energy efficient windows should not have gaps, so if yours do, contact the manufacturer to see if they are reparable under warranty. Older windows, just like doors, may have crevices due to poor installation, shrinkage, or age-related misalignment. Where gaps are not correctable with weather strip or caulk, consider budgeting to replace them. NOTE: do not seal a bedroom window shut. Bedroom windows must offer egress in case of a fire or other emergency.
  • Roof gaps. As the roof gets older, spaces may form from movement in the home's walls and foundation. If your roof leaks, there is a gap someplace, and a professional roofer should be your first call. Leaving a roof leak can damage your entire home and weaken its structure.
  • Indoor gaps. One of the most frustrating gaps appearing in the kitchen is one between the stove and the countertop next to it. These gaps become filled with gunk and debris. If yours is a built-in range, close the gap with caulk. If, however, you have a freestanding range, look for countertop extenders or gap-fillers at your local hardware or DIY store or search online for silicone counter gap guards or spill guards.
  • Backsplash gaps. If your kitchen or bath backsplash has separated from the countertop, fill the gap with a waterproof caulk immediately. Water running between the counter and the backsplash can cause considerable damage to counters, walls, cabinets, and even subflooring if the water finds its way down the pipes.

If you think you may have energy-leaking gaps in your home, check with your local utility to see if they provide a free energy assessment. Repairing gaps protects your home and maintains your home’s value.




Tags: weather   DIY   homeowner  
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