Pamela Bailey
RE/MAX On the Move | Insight | Advantage | 603-770-0369 | [email protected]


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 2/27/2019

If a seller rejects your offer to purchase his or her house, there is no need to panic. At this point, there are many things you can do, including:

1. Craft a New Offer to Purchase

If at first you don't succeed, try again. Remember, if you find your dream house but your initial offer to purchase is rejected, you can always create a new homebuying proposal. And if you submit a new offer to purchase that falls in line with a seller's expectations, you may receive an instant "Yes."

For those who decide to submit a new offer to purchase a residence, it is important to avoid making the same mistake twice. Thus, you should analyze the home you want to purchase, along with the current housing sector. Because if you use a variety of real estate market data, you could submit a competitive offer to purchase your dream house.

2. Reenter the Housing Market

A seller may reject your offer to purchase his or her house, and as such, you may need to continue your home search. Fortunately, quality residences are available in cities and towns nationwide, which means there are lots of great houses at your disposal.

Of course, you may want to put together a homebuying budget, too. If you have a homebuying budget in hand, you can search for houses that match your price range.

To craft a homebuying budget, you should meet with banks and credit unions. These financial institutions can offer home financing insights and help you get pre-approved for a mortgage. And once you have a mortgage, you will know exactly how much you can spend to acquire your ideal house.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is happy to help you determine the best course of action after a seller rejects your offer to purchase. In fact, he or she will do everything possible to help you streamline the homebuying journey.

Typically, a real estate agent will learn about you and your homebuying goals. He or she then will create a homebuying plan designed to help you achieve your desired results. Next, you and a real estate agent will work together to transform your homebuying vision into a reality. And as you navigate the homebuying journey, a real estate agent will provide comprehensive housing market insights you may struggle to obtain elsewhere.

Let's not forget about the assistance a real estate agent will provide as you get ready to submit an offer to purchase a house, either. A real estate agent will help you craft a competitive offer to purchase any home, at any time. Best of all, if your homebuying proposal is accepted, a real estate agent will help you finalize your house purchase as quickly as possible.

Clearly, there are many things you can do if your offer to purchase your ideal house is rejected. If you start planning ahead for the homebuying journey, you could boost the likelihood of enjoying a seamless property buying experience.





Posted by Pamela Bailey on 5/16/2018

When you find a home you love, you most likely will want to take the steps you can to buy it. When a home is already under contract, there’s actually a little-known strategy that can be used to help you have a chance at getting the property. 


When you make a backup offer, you’re doing all of the same things you’d do under normal circumstances. The only difference between a normal offer and a backup offer is that you’re not guaranteed to get the home. The first deal needs to fall through in order for you to have a shot.


Advantages To Backup Offers


The backup offer is a bit of a stretch, but it still does give you a little bit of a chance to get a home. When a backup offer is in place, the home won’t just go back on the market if something falls through. This is especially smart when it comes to lower inventory markets. When a home is re-listed, you’ll need to compete against other buyers. If a bidding war is initiated, the home’s price will keep going up. The backup offer being in place helps the seller to feel secure in the sale of their home one way or another. If for any reason the first buyer falls through, you’ll be able to swoop in and get the home yourself.


Timing Is Everything


Keep in mind that there’s a certain period of time before a deal needs to be closed on for a home. The original buyer will need to close the deal on the home in an average of 50 days. Knowing the time frame that you’ll need to wait around for a decision is helpful for you in your own search for a home.


You can also have your agent check in with the listing agent for the property on a frequent basis. This lets the agent ad seller know that you have a keen interest in the property in case there are any difficulties coming from the other side of the deal. 


If The First Deal Doesn’t Go Through


If the first deal on a home does fall through, you’re not the new owner of the home just yet. There’s always a possibility that the first buyers found some very difficult problems with the home during the inspection. These could be big issues like an issue with the roof or the foundation of the home. Be sure to include a home inspection contingency with your contract so that you can have your own inspection conducted. This way, you’ll know if there are any problems with the home and that you will be able to deal with them.


A backup offer can be a great tool to use in tight markets to help you get a home that you love. It’s always a good idea to proceed with caution in any home deal to make a sound financial decision.




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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 1/11/2017

The real estate market is filled with many high-quality residences, and after a comprehensive search, you've found a residence that fits your personal needs and budget perfectly. However, you may need to think twice before you submit an offer on this residence. There are many factors that homebuyers should consider before they make an offer on a house, including: 1. Neighborhood Ideally, you'll want to find a home in a community filled with friendly neighbors. But in many cases, homebuyers may focus exclusively on a residence and ignore the neighborhood entirely. Taking a walk around a neighborhood often allows you to get a better feel about what it is like to live in a neighborhood and may give you a chance to meet some of the neighbors as well. Also, a simple walk around the block will provide you with a better idea about whether a house's value may rise or fall in the foreseeable future. For instance, a neighborhood filled with houses with well-maintained front lawns, nearby parks and schools and other local amenities may prosper for years to come, and home values may rise in this neighborhood over the next few years. 2. Crime No one wants to live in an unsafe area, and you can learn about crime near a prospective home before you submit an offer on a residence. Contacting a local police station usually is a great idea for homebuyers who want to find out about crime statistics in a particular area. Furthermore, your real estate agent can provide insights into crime in a specific area and help you determine whether a particular house is the best option. 3. Traffic Although your dream home features all of the amenities you want, it might fail to provide you with quick, easy access to your office day after day. For example, traffic can be a problem if your house is located in or near a major city. And if you need to travel to work every day, it is important to understand how traffic could affect your daily commute. To better understand traffic patterns in a particular area, try driving to a residence at different times during the day. By doing so, you can learn about traffic patterns near a house and be better equipped to make a more informed decision about whether to submit an offer on a residence. 4. Taxes You've been pre-approved for a mortgage and have established a monthly budget for a new home, but taxes may vary depending on where you move. Thus, you'll want to learn as much as possible about potential taxes that you could face at a new residence before you submit an offer. Taxes may add up quickly, but homebuyers who budget accordingly can minimize the risk that they'll fall behind on tax bills. And with support from your real estate agent, you can learn about taxes that you may encounter if you purchase a particular residence. If you're fully satisfied with a residence after you consider the aforementioned factors, you'll be ready to submit an offer and move one step closer to moving into your dream house.





Posted by Pamela Bailey on 9/2/2015

After lots of searching you have found the house that you'd like to call home. Next step, you'll need to make an offer. Purchase contracts vary from state to state but a basic offer includes the price you're willing to pay for the house, your financing terms, and contingencies. When it is time to put your offer on paper you will want to make sure it is well planned. There are seven key elements to a good offer: 1. A realistic offering price In order to put forth a great offer you will want to set your price based on similar homes recently sold in the neighborhood. Your real estate agent will help you look at comparable properties to determine that price. You will also want to keep in mind the state of the market in your area. If homes are selling quickly and receiving multiple offers, you'll need to bid competitively. If home sales are slower you may want to be a little more conservative in your offer. 2. Realistic financing terms Always make sure you are pre-approved for a loan before making an offer. Include proof that you are pre-approved with your offer, many lenders will give you a letter. 3. A property inspection clause A home inspection clause will give you a chance to have the property inspected. You will want to use a professional home inspector to thoroughly inspect the property you are buying. 4. Any concessions or contingencies Sometimes there are additional items that should be covered in the offer. You will want to outline any concessions like closing costs or repairs. If you are financing your home you will need to include a financing contingency. 5. Conveyances Always put in the offer what is included in the sale. For instance, a washer and dryer or any other items that are included in the sale of the property. 6. A deadline An offer should always include a deadline for a response. 7. It is all in writing Everything should always be in writing. Never rely on verbal agreements.