Pamela Bailey
RE/MAX On the Move | Insight | Advantage | 603-770-0369 | [email protected]


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 1/15/2020

Photo by Analogicus via Pixabay

After settling into your home, you start to notice a few things either need to be retouched or completely overhauled. The biggest issue that a lot of homeowners run into is the money for the project. Even after assessing whether the project is a DIY or you’ll need a professional, funding still comes before action. Here are a few funding options to consider before you begin your home improvement projects.

Borrow from Your Future: 401(K)

A vast number of traditionally employed homeowners have a 401(K). Often, an employer will deposit funds into this account just as the employee does, but did you know you can borrow from it? If your housing project requires a little more than what you have in your savings account, try taking a little from your 401(K). Remember, even though it’s your account, it’s not free money. You will have to put it back once you’re able, and if you separate from your current company, you may run into a few extra fees if the money isn’t returned within five (5) years.

Government-Backed Improvement Loans

There are a few different types of government-backed loans that allow you to improve your home. You just need to identify the category your home improvement falls under. If you’re looking to do a few moderate improvements, try the 203K loan. These loans are great if you’ve purchased a preexisting home and have a few hefty renovations to cover. You can even add this loan to your mortgage payments.

If your home improvement project happens to fall more along the “greener” side of things, such as heating/cooling, water-efficient landscaping, energy reduction systems, etc., you may be able to apply for a PACE loan. These loans are pretty easy to get approval for, can often receive tax credits and may be sold to your next buyer when you decide to move.

Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)

Have you been in your home for a while? Maybe a HELOC would be the best method for you to finance your home improvement projects. Since your home has accrued equity over the years, you’ll be able to secure the loan by using it as collateral. These loans are often suited for long renovations or projects that may require a few extra stages.

If your home improvement projects end up with a longer price tag than you were expecting, don’t fret. There are several other ways that you’ll be able to cover the cost, including tax credits and grants. If you’re prepping your home to sell in the near future, chat with your agent about the best renovations, improvements and repairs, as well as, how to fund them.






Tags: loans   home improvement   401K   Funding   Grants  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 1/8/2020

If you’re in a space with a small kitchen, you know that you face a lot of problems including not enough storage, minuscule amounts of prep space, and barely enough room for more than one person in the kitchen at a time. The layout of the room along with the design is what you must work with when you have a small kitchen. There are a few storage solutions that you can use to make your kitchen into a workable space.



Clear The Clutter


Do you have a lot of gadgets hanging around your kitchen that you aren’t using on a regular basis? If there’s no space to store them, perhaps you should consider getting rid of them. That ice cream maker that you may have thought was a good idea to purchase may sit unused, taking up space. You should store only the things you need, and get rid of any items that are just collecting dust. 


Use An Armoire Or Other Shelving Unit


Small kitchens often lack cabinet space. You can use items like armories and bookshelves to give yourself more storage space. Whether you need to store dishes, food items, or pots and pans, these unusual items can help to provide you big amounts of storage. You can even add your own shelves to kitchen walls. All of these ideas provide inexpensive, yet practical solutions to your kitchen storage woes. 


Find An Island


There are carts and other portable kitchen island units that exist to provide additional storage and prep space fro you. Many of these have fold-out counter space and drawers and cabinets. If you have some floor space in your small kitchen, this could be a great use of that space. 


Hang Your Things


No matter how small your kitchen is, you have some room to hang things. You can use hooks in various places in the kitchen whether it’s on a wall or under a shelf. All of your utensils and pots and pans have the ability to hang up somewhere. Give yourself some more storage room and maximize the space that you do have in the kitchen. There are various designs that you can make use of to hang pots and pans using hooks, racks, or even a hanging shelf. Hang your utensils strategically so they are within reach of your cooking area.


Work Upwards


Remember that you have a lot of space available over your head in most cases in a small kitchen. The more you can maximize vertical space, the better off you’ll be. You can place your least used items the highest up and work your way down. 


With the right techniques, storage space doesn’t have to be a huge issue in a small kitchen.




Tags: kitchen   storage   small space  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 1/1/2020

Doing a home improvement or renovation is a great way to add value to your home while learning something new. If you decide to DIY, you can enlist the help of your family and learn together.

But, when you’re taking on a task you’ve never done before, there’s a lot that can go wrong. You might go over budget, or the project might take significantly longer than expected. Sometimes we start jobs that we don’t have the expertise (or permits) to finish and have to call in a professional sinking more time and money into what was supposed to be an inexpensive renovation.

To help you avoid some of these common pitfalls, we’ve provided these tips for running a successful home improvement project so you can focus on your renovation and not on the headaches that come with it.

1. Know when to call the experts

Undertaking a do-it-yourself project can be fun and rewarding. However, some tasks are better left to the professionals. Plumbing and electrical mistakes, in particular, can be dangerous and costly if you get it wrong. You don’t want to disregard the safety of you, your family, and your belongings just to save money on hiring a professional.

2. Call the best expert for the job

Call multiple professionals for a quote before accepting an offer.

If you received what seems a very low quote for a job, make sure to call other experts in the industry to see how much they would charge for the job. Getting an unusually low offer could be a sign that the contractor will rush the project or use cheap materials.

Alternatively, if you receive a quote that seems too high, the contractor may have a busy schedule or might not really want the job, so they’ve offered you a price they don’t expect you to take.

Regardless of who you choose, see if you can find reviews and testimonials to make sure you’ve selected a contractor who is professional and has good customer feedback.

3. Aim high with your budget

When homeowners take on a renovation, they tend to underestimate the costs. To avoid being shocked by going over budget, estimate what you think the total costs would be and then at another twenty percent. That twenty percent could account for damaged building materials, mistakes, or last-minute changes and customizations--all are frequent on DIY projects.

4. Don’t work without a design or blueprint

Even for simple home improvement projects, it’s best to start out with a plan. Having detailed measurements and drawings to refer to will help you avoid costly mistakes. We’ve all felt the temptation to “eyeball it” when working on a project--taking the extra few minutes to measure and refer to your plan will save you time in the long run.

5. Relax and focus on the results

Home improvement projects can be a source of frustration for many families. If you aren’t an expert, it’s easy to get angry when things aren’t going as you planned. If you find yourself frequently hitting a wall-literally or figuratively--step back from the project and refocus on the end goal, improving your home for years to come.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 12/25/2019

Image by Mohamed Hassan from Pixabay

When it’s time to sell your home, it’s important to make sure it’s done right. Certain selling mistakes could lead to less money for your home than you wanted or other problems that make this process more complicated than it needs to be. Before you put your home on the market, keep these common home selling mistakes in mind, so you can avoid them.

Setting a Price That’s Too High

Although you’ll want to get as much as you can for your home, setting a listing price that is too high could keep buyers away. The price you set for your home should be based on different factors, such as how much similar homes have been selling for in your area or whether or not you’ve made any upgrades that boost the value of your house. Keep in mind that according to the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the typical home stayed on the market for just 3 weeks before being sold. Having a listing price that is too high could lead to a much longer time on the market for your home.

Skipping Major Repairs

If you’re eager to sell your home, you might be tempted to skip major repairs. While this saves you time and money now, it can make it much more difficult to sell your home. You might also end up having to lower your price considerably, since buyers will factor in the cost of these repairs when making their bid.

Grabbing the Highest Offer

While the highest offer might seem like the right one to take, this isn’t always the case. Buyers who are offering the highest bid might include contingencies that make their offer more costly than it seems in terms of money or time. For example, they might include a contingency that they need to sell their own home before buying yours. Rather than focusing on the highest offer, it’s better to look for the best offer, which depends on different factors, such as how soon you want to sell or how much you’re willing to include for seller credits toward repairs.

Deciding Not to Hire a Real Estate Agent

Working with a real estate agent provides you with guidance and expertise while selling your home. Your agent can help you get a better price for your home and attract potential home buyers with open houses and home staging. According to NAR, 91 percent of sellers hired real estate agents to assist them with selling their home. These sellers were able to sell their homes for 99 percent of their listing price. Choosing to sell without a real estate agent could significantly affect how long it takes to sell your home and how much you get for it.




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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 12/18/2019

When pests come into your home, there’s no creepier feeling that you may have as a homeowner. You may turn to your house insurance for assistance if the problem gets really bad. Let’s say that termites have taken over your home and gotten into your walls or foundation. Maybe mice have gotten into the walls of your home, or a squirrel has caused some major issues in the attic. Whatever the problem is, you want to remedy it quickly. It might be an expensive fix no matter what, but it has to be remedied for you to continue to live comfortably in your home. 


The Truth About Homeowners Insurance


Unfortunately, homeowners insurance doesn't cover pest infestations. It doesn’t matter if the termites have literally eaten you out of house and home, the insurance companies consider pests to be an avoidable problem. Even though you may wonder how bugs can be considered “avoidable,” it’s simple. The insurance company believes that regular maintenance and checking of your property can help to prevent bug infestations. This is why it’s so important to take care of your property and not neglect it. 


Collateral Damage


There are a few exceptions to the rule. If your ceiling caves in and it was caused by some of the pest damage, your insurance may cover the cost of the repairs to the ceiling. They may not cover the materials that are needed to repair the ceiling itself. Insurance claims can be tricky, so you’ll need to ask a lot of questions if these problems do occur for you.


What Homeowners Insurance Covers


There’s nothing more frustrating than paying an insurance premium to find out that it doesn’t actually cover anything that you need at a certain point and time. As a general rule, homeowners insurance policies cover things that are considered accidental. This would include natural disasters like hurricanes, hailstorms, or high winds. If a tree falls on your home due to a windstorm, there was really no way of preventing that from happening. Your insurance would cover this. Damage that happens over an extended period, like that of a pest infestation or an aging home generally is not covered by house insurance. 


Separate Policies


Some insurance companies do offer separate policies to cover damage from certain types of pests like termites. There are several varieties of insects that cause damage to wood structures, so these policies may be more general stating that they provide “wood destroying insect” coverage. If you live in an area that’s prone to termites, there’s a few options available to you including something called “termite bonds.”


Your best course of action as a homeowner is prevention. Keep up with regular maintenance around your home and inspect your home regularly for any problems that you may find.




Categories: Uncategorized