Pamela Bailey
RE/MAX On the Move & Insight | 603-770-0369 | pebailey001@gmail.com


Posted by Pamela Bailey on 12/6/2017

Many people are finding that their paychecks aren't getting them as far as they used to. The cost of groceries is constantly rising, gas prices are creeping back up, and services like cable and wireless seem to increase every with every bill. To keep up with it all, many people opt to put in more hours at work or find a second job. However, if you're not comfortable with sacrificing your free time there are other ways to keep up with the bills. There are many hobbies that can earn you extra income and will help you learn new skills in the process. This article will overview some income-driving hobbies for everyone and show you how to monetize them to help pay the bills.

Sell your photography

Photography is an amazing skill to learn. Once you get past the basics of understanding shutter speed and aperture, you'll find you can take all different types of photos. Many people associate photography with being very expensive, and while it certainly can be, advancements in the technology have made it rather affordable to get started. Once you've learned the ins and outs of your camera, there are a few ways to earn money from photography. If you have an eye for detail and setting things up, you could try selling stock photography online or taking product photography for local crafters. If you're more of a "people" person, then portraits might be more of a rewarding hobby for you. Graduation photos and family portraits are both good ways to learn the basics. Eventually you could try out being a second shooter at a wedding; meaning you work with a professional wedding photographer to help them get more shots of the wedding and reception. As you improve and build experience, you can increase your prices.

Build things people will love

When I was younger my father worked full-time and when he came home the first thing he did was head outside to start working on whatever building project he had going on. Sheds, picnic tables, tree houses... there's no end to the types of things you can build in your backyard. Getting money for your hard work is easy in the age of the internet. Most important, though, is that you're building things people will love. Pinterest is packed with ideas and YouTube full of tutorials when it comes to inspiration and learning. Once you've completed your project you can put in on your local Craigslist, a Facebook group, or even in your front lawn with a For Sale sign.

Blogging and copyediting

Would you be the first one to notice if there was a typo in this article? Do you find yourself occasionally thinking, "That would be a really good topic to write about"? Blogging and digital copyediting are two growing markets with a lot of opportunity for those of us with a passion for the written word. To work with existing businesses there are several websites that allow you to market your services online. Pick a topic that you're interested in or one you're already an expert at, and reach out to companies in that industry. If you're more of the DIY type, make your own blog with the help of a site like WordPress. Once you build a readership, you can monetize with ads and sponsors.




Tags: bills   money   hobbies   finance   income   photography   carpentry   writing  
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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 11/29/2017

Buying a house involves dozens of interrelated decisions, many of which could affect the quality of your life for years to come. No pressure, though!

Working with an experienced real estate agent with whom you feel comfortable is one strategy for successfully navigating many of those pivotal decisions. The ideal buyers' agent will be familiar with neighborhoods in your target area, and is trained to help you match your requirements with properties in your price range. They can assist you in developing a priority list of things you want and need in your next home.

In addition to noticing the features of each individual house you're considering, there's also the bigger picture of the character of the neighborhood in which homes are located. Here are a few things you may want to keep in mind as you visit different homes for sale.

  • Street traffic: There are several distinct disadvantages to living close to a busy street or highway. First of all, there's the noise factor, which is often a deal breaker for people who thrive on peace and quiet! If you have young children, a busy street can also be a potential safety hazard. When you have cars constantly driving by your house, privacy is another issue to consider.
  • Proximity of houses: Speaking of privacy and quiet, there's also the question of how physically close houses are situated next to each other. If they're only ten or twenty feet away, then you might end up knowing more about your neighbors than you really want to! (The reverse of that is also true.) In those instances, privacy hedges and tall fences can provide some benefits.
  • Appearance of the neighborhood: If nearby houses are in run-down condition or poorly maintained, that's generally a "red flag," in regard to the quality of the neighborhood. The same can usually be said about prospective neighbors who keep junk vehicles or construction debris on their property for any length of time. If you're considering a neighborhood with one or more abandoned houses on the street, proceed with caution. However, what you see, is not always what you get! Appearances can be misleading, and there may be plans underway, for example, to demolish a fire-damaged house and replace it with a new and improved home. Very often your real estate agent can find out more about the circumstances surrounding an abandoned or boarded-up house. They may also be able to help you research crime statistics for a particular neighborhood or street.
  • Convenience factors: All things being equal, it's nice to live within walking distance or a short drive from grocery stores, drug stores, banks, public parks, the post office, child care services, schools, doctors, dentists, hospitals, veterinarians, restaurants, and other amenities.
When you've narrowed down your house search to one or two possibilities, a lot of useful information can be gathered by scheduling a couple additional visits and/or walkthroughs -- especially at different times of the day or week. Second and third visits to homes you're considering can definitely shed additional light on factors such as noise level and other quality of life issues.





Posted by Pamela Bailey on 11/22/2017

Whether you have a free-standing pantry, or a dedicated room for storing your kitchen essentials, there’s certain things that you should do to make sure your pantry is organized and that you have easy access to all of your items. Here’s some tips for good organization in your kitchen pantry: Be Careful With Stacking Canned Goods If you stack large items with other smaller items, such as different sized canned goods, it can pose a problem. An alternative to this storage dilemma is that of using risers. If you don’t want to put risers in because you feel that they’ll take up too much space, remember that these storage tools are giving you space in a different sense. However you choose to stack your canned goods, remember that the shortest item should be in the front. Organizing your canned goods by height can help to save you time and space. Store Open Items In Airtight Containers Items that have been opened should be stored in an airtight container with a lid. This can save you money by keeping items fresh. Also, you and your family will know what food items have been opened and need to be finished up before new items are ripped open. Keep cereals, crackers, cookies and even pet food fresh with the use of this simple tactic. Stacking Bins Save Space If you’re like most of America, your town probably recycles. Consider getting stacking bins for the pantry or kitchen area to place recyclables in. Make sure these bins aren’t too large. This way, you’ll be on top of taking the recycling outside to where it needs to be. This organizing tip helps to keep your kitchen clean. Also, be sure that these containers are easy to open for your convenience. Categorize Your Snack Foods Your kitchen pantry area will stay much more organized if you keep things in categories. Cookies and other sweet snacks should stay on one shelf in one area. Snacks for the kids should be easy to grab for little hands (that is of course if the kids have free reign over the kitchen!) Savory and salty snacks are a different category that will be on a completely different shelf and area. Baskets can be a great accessory for single-serve items. Boxes that snack items come in often take up a lot of space that could be better used. Bags of chips and other items are the same way. These bagged items can be transferred to sealable containers. Baskets are also easy to carry around if you’re offering a choice of snacks. Be sure you have clips to close bags and packages to keep snack items fresh. How Deep Is Your Shelf? Be mindful when it comes to shelving items like bottles that are all the same size. This can make things hard to find. These types of items are often best stored on a lazy Susan, or other type of turn-style storage that easily spins and allows you to see what’s available for your cooking use. This way, you’ll never have to move a bunch of things to find what you’re looking for! These kitchen pantry storage tips will help you to stay organized and save time both cooking and cleaning.




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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 11/15/2017

Have you found your almost dream house, but there’s just one small catch holding you back? If lack of storage space is preventing you from placing your bid don’t write that house off just yet. If you’re willing to put in some work to your new house I’ve got some creative solutions that can help you look at your space in a new way. Here are a five “faux” built-in idea to add to your home to leverage precious space out of those “awkward” corners and empty walls.

1. Build a bookcase along the wall of a staircase. If you have an empty wall created by a staircase you can create a one of kind bookcase to store books, movies, and knick-knacks. This is a perfect solution for those walls that are too small to place furniture in front of but too large to go unused.

2. Utilize any alcoves. If your home comes with any alcoves, consider yourself lucky! These can make for a great spot to tuck in a built-in desk and provides plenty of room for overhead shelving to store books as well as office and school supplies. If an office nook isn’t your cup of tea you could also easily turn this space into a crafting corner for scrapbooking or sewing. 

3. Turn a dead end hallway into a useful and inviting space. A dead end hallway that leads to a window may add lots of light to a home but it can also be an awkward place for furniture. Depending on the size of the space you could add a linen storage that doubles as a small window seat. 

4. Create a welcoming mudroom that acts as a catch-all for your family's shoes and outerwear. Add a wall-length bench with room to store shoes underneath and hooks for jackets and bags overhead. You can add a shelf over the hooks for even more storage (think sports equipment and outdoor toys). Get creative with molding and shiplap for a one of a kind addition to your home that looks original to the house. 

5. If a room lacks a closet, add your own. This solution is only limited by your imagination. You can either pick up a kit or go completely DIY.  Many stores, such as Ikea, offer floor to ceiling closet kits, these are usually sleek and modern with sliding doors. Alternatively, you can come up with your own custom design that stretches a wall, fills a corner or juts out and creates an alcove for you to fit a bed or desk into. This is another project that with the addition of millwork will look seamless and original to the home. 

When a couple finds their dream home it doesn’t always guarantee it’s a 100 percent perfect fit for their lifestyle. More often than not they usually find themselves with a list of changes they would like to make that will turn their new house into a well-loved home. If your new home doesn’t have a lot of storage options don’t forget that you can easily add your own with a little creativity and elbow grease!




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Posted by Pamela Bailey on 11/8/2017

Apartment living attracts the Millennial generation and older adults. People are attracted to apartment living, in part, because apartments are generally centrally located. Apartments are near public transportation, shopping centers, grocery stores and restaurants.

Make apartment living do more than put a roof over your head

Better yet, there are generally no maintenance costs associated with living in an apartment. Live on the top floor of an apartment building and experience a roof leak, and all you generally have to do is pick up the telephone and call the management or maintenance office.

Although you won't have to pay to get a problem fixed, when you live in an apartment, you learn about repairs that are typically needed around a home. This makes apartment living more like owning a home than staying with your parents does. If you're thinking about renting an apartment, you could be making a smart move. Checkout these other ways that apartment living can prepare you for buying and maintaining a house:

  • Gets you accustomed to managing a budget so that you can meet your monthly rent
  • Lets you find out firsthand how important it is to meet your financial obligations. If you don't pay your rent on time, you could receive an eviction notice.
  • Shows you how not taking care of household appliances can leave you without dish washer, clothes washer, dryer and other conveniences. For example, if you over load a washing machine, you could cause the machine to break or flood. Over load your clothes dryer or not clean out the filter and  you could cause the appliance to over heat. Although you can put in a maintenance request, you may have to go a day or longer without the appliances before they are fixed.
  • Teaches you about the importance of having residential insurance. Many apartments recommend or request that you have renter's insurance.
  • Is a great way to see what your home will look like if you don't clean up after yourself. Leave food on the counter, the floor dirty and clothes laying on the floor and you could run out of pants and shirts to wear to work. You could also attract pests into your home.
  • Prepares you to deal with neighbors directly and indirectly. You'll learn how to communicate with people with diverse interests.

Buy a house could be easier if you start out in an apartment

Living in an apartment can serve as a step toward home ownership. Apartment living makes you aware of residential repairs needed to maintain a property. While you live in an apartment, you can also learn about non-typical repairs, including unexpected appliance breaks.

Other outcomes of apartment living are the chance to learn whether you're better off living at a property that has uncovered or covered parking. You can also learn how to deal with neighbors, manage pets and accommodate guests. Most of all, apartment living prepares you for the financial responsibility of paying a monthly mortgage.